Effects of LSD 100% Positive in New Swiss Study, LSD Still Awesome

lsd consciousness trip

LSD alters consciousness in extraordinary ways. http://www.marijuana.com/

The incredible therapeutic properties of LSD have once again been confirmed in a recent Swiss study. It was the first therapeutic study on LSD to take place in 40 years.  The study specifically focused on treating anxiety associated with life-threatening illnesses. Psychotherapy was also used in conjunction with LSD to treat participants’ anxiety.

Related Article: Afraid to Wake Up? Conquering Fear and Life

lsd flowers happy

What is so scary about seeing the smell of flowers? pulsatta.blogspot.com

12 participants in total were involved in the study. Amazingly, every single participant reported experiencing major decreases in anxiety levels due to the LSD-assisted psychotherapy. These decreases in anxiety persisted even 12 months after being administered the LSD. Furthermore, no negative effects were reported by any of the participants. The study was led by Peter Gasser, M.D., who stated that,

…we had in 30 sessions (22 with full dose 200 μg LSD and 8 with placebo dose 20 μg LSD) no severe side effects such as psychotic experiences or suicidal crisis or flashbacks or severe anxieties (bad trips)…That means that we can show that LSD treatment can be safe when it is done in a carefully controlled clinical setting.

Subjects receiving 200 µg LSD and psychotherapy, compared to an active placebo of 20 µg LSD, experienced a reduction in anxiety. Because the reduction in anxiety was still present at a 12-month follow up, Gasser believes that LSD has incredible potential for treating a whole array of psychological conditions. This study is particularly remarkable because unlike previous studies on the efficacy of LSD-assisted psychotherapy, this study employed a random, double blind active placebo.

Related Article: Psychiatrists Cannot Distinguish the Sane From Insane

Researchers noted that one of the most important aspects of the study was that the participants were able to freely contemplate and discuss their experiences while under the effects of LSD, as well as after the trip had ended. A structured and supportive environment appears to be crucial in attaining psychological benefits as well as ensuring that a “bad trip” doesn’t occur.

lsd paper bicycle

LSD blotter paper depicting Albert Hoffman on Bicycle Day.   www.trip-dealer.com

Psychedelics of all types have been studied and found almost across the board to be incredibly safe and highly effective tools in psychotherapy. Despite this clearly illustrated fact, psychedelics continue to be irrationally feared and demonized in the same ignorant fashion as cannabis. Interested in LSD? Let’s go for a trip.

Related Article: The Extraordinary Benefits of Psilocybin in Magic Mushrooms

Psychedelics such as LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin do not cause brain damage and are considered by medical professionals to be non-addictive.  Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline.

Lysergic acid diethylamide, or LSD, was discovered accidentally by Albert Hoffman on April 16, 1943. He had actually unintentionally created it 5 years prior while attempting to synthesize potentially medicinal active constituents from ergot fungus, a fungus that grows on rye. For 5 years the synthesis collected dust until he decided to reexamine it. While reexamining the LSD a small amount was absorbed into Hoffman’s fingertip. He describes his experience:

Last Friday, April 16,1943, I was forced to interrupt my work in the laboratory in the middle of the afternoon and proceed home, being affected by a remarkable restlessness, combined with a slight dizziness. At home I lay down and sank into a not unpleasant intoxicated-like condition, characterized by an extremely stimulated imagination. In a dreamlike state, with eyes closed (I found the daylight to be unpleasantly glaring), I perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors. After some two hours this condition faded away.

Hoffman was intrigued, and three days later he tried it again, marking April 19, 1943 as the first day a human being ever intentionally consumed LSD. This day is now known as “Bicycle Day,” because Hoffman rode his bike home while he was tripping. Hoffman and his wife spent the rest of their lives advocating the use of LSD, psilocybin, and other psychedelics in the field of psychotherapy. Below is a documentary on LSD which focuses on Albert Hoffman.

The effects of LSD last for 6-11 hours on average. This time period is dependent on various factors such as dosage and body mass.

LSD Duration
Oral
Total Duration
6 – 11 hrs
Onset
20 – 60 mins
Coming Up
15 – 30 mins
Plateau
3 – 6 hrs
Coming Down
3 – 5 hrs
After Effects
2 – 5 hrs
Hangover / Day After
– – –
DURATION CHART
The effects of LSD are numerous, and are entirely dependent on set (your personality, goals, desires, mental state, etc.) and setting ( your environment, time of day, people you are surrounded by, etc.). According to Erowid, the potential effects of LSD include:
POSITIVE
  • mental and physical stimulation
  • increase in associative & creative thinking
  • mood lift
  • increased awareness & appreciation of music
  • sensory enhancement (taste, smell, etc)
  • closed- and open-eye visuals, including trails, color shifts, brightening, etc.
  • life-changing spiritual experiences
  • therapeutic psychological reflection
  • feeling of oceanic connectedness to the universe; blurring of boundaries between self and other
NEUTRAL
  • general change in consciousness
  • pupil dilation
  • difficulty focusing
  • increased salivation and mucus production (causes coughing in some people)
  • unusual body sensations (facial flushing, chills, goosebumps, body energy)
  • unusual thoughts and speech
  • change in perception of time
  • quickly changing emotions (happiness, fear, gidiness, anxiety, anger, joy, irritation)
  • slight increase in body temperature
  • slight increase in heart rate
  • increase in yawning (without being tired)
  • looping, recursive, out of control thinking
NEGATIVE
  • anxiety
  • tension, jaw tension
  • increased perspiration
  • difficulty regulating body temperature
  • nausea
  • dizziness, confusion
  • insomnia
  • megalomania
  • over-awareness & over-sensitization to music and noise
  • paranoia, fear, and panic
  • unwanted and overwhelming feelings
  • unwanted life-changing spiritual experiences
  • flashbacks
lsd blotter paper type

Examples of the creativity involved with LSD blotter paper. http://www.tagohio.com/

Clearly a controlled setting is essential in attaining positive therapeutic results when using LSD. While a “bad trip” is always possible, carefully controlling set and setting can virtually guarantee a positive, life altering experience. As researcher Teri Krebs from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU) Department of Neuroscience explains,

Everything has some potential for negative effects, but psychedelic use is overall considered to pose a very low risk to the individual and to society. Psychedelics can elicit temporary feelings of anxiety and confusion, but accidents leading to serious injury are extremely rare. Early speculation that psychedelics might lead to mental health problems was based on a small number of case reports and did not take into account either the widespread use of psychedelics or the not infrequent rate of mental health problems in the general population. Over the past 50 years tens of millions of people have used psychedelics and there just is not much evidence of long-term problems.

It is extremely difficult to describe a psychedelic experience, largely because it is so utterly strange relative to the state of consciousness we normally operate in. In a book called The Psychedelic Experience, Timothy Leary, Richard Alpert (Ram Dass) and Ralph Metzner describe a psychedelic trip.

A psychedelic experience is a journey to new realms of consciousness. The scope and content of the experience is limitless, but its characteristic features are the transcendence of verbal concepts, of spacetime dimensions, and of the ego or identity. Such experiences of enlarged consciousness can occur in a variety of ways: sensory deprivation, yoga exercises, disciplined meditation, religious or aesthetic ecstasies, or spontaneously. Most recently they have become available to anyone through the ingestion of psychedelic drugs such as LSD,psilocybinmescalineDMT, etc. Of course, the drug does not produce the transcendent experience. It merely acts as a chemical key — it opens the mind, frees the nervous system of its ordinary patterns and structures.

Related Article: Mystery of Death Solved: DMT is the Key

LSD and other psychedelics have the potential to wildly alter a person’s life in extraordinary ways. A great example of this is illustrated by the drastic reduction in recidivism when US prisoners are given just one dose of LSD under the guidance of a trained professional. A recent study on recidivism rates among substance abusing community offenders found that the use of hallucinogens during therapy had incredible success in curbing anti-social behavior and treating addiction. This is great news since the United States has more prisoners than any other country in the world. In many states recidivism rates can be as high as 78%.

lsd set setting

Set and setting are the key to any LSD trip. http://www.sevencounties.org/

The fact is that LSD is awesome, as long as it is used in the right way, and under the right circumstances. Then again, the same applies to everything.  Hammers are awesome, unless you are using them to break toes at a 5 year old’s party. Noodles are awesome, unless you’re using them to poke people in the eye at a local library. LSD is awesome, as long as it is used by an experienced user or under the guidance of a trained professional.

Related Article: Private Prison Sues State for Not Having Enough Prisoners

Even the CIA is interested psychedlics such as in LSD. MKUltra wasn’t performed just for fun after all. Too bad the CIA was too busy trying to use LSD as a mind control device to recognize its value in giving aid to ailing minds.

Below are two interviews from the 1950s of people who were asked various questions while under the effects of LSD. Although they provide only minimal insight into the actual psychedelic experience, they are interesting to watch nonetheless.

And a more recent one for good measure:

Expand your mind, mind your expansion. Be always growing.

 

Sources:

http://maps.org/pdf/LDA1_FINAL_CSR_20Aug13.pdf

http://psychedelicfrontier.com/2014/01/maps-completes-first-new-therapeutic-lsd-study-in-40-years/

http://www.maps.org/research/

http://www.psychedelic-library.org/child1.htm

http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/lsd/lsd_effects.shtml

http://jop.sagepub.com/content/28/1/62.abstract

http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=17

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKUltra

http://www.cracked.com/blog/five-fun-facts-about-the-cia-and-lsd/

http://www.ntnu.edu/news/2013-news/lsd-survey

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0063972

15 thoughts on “Effects of LSD 100% Positive in New Swiss Study, LSD Still Awesome

  1. Correct me, subjects in this study weren’t simply given LSD to see what/how it does. It was a study of LSD-assisted PSYCHOTHERAPY treatment, was it not?

    And what’s more interesting? The study itself, its results – or larger reflection evident in – not only this feature. There seems an entire internet industry that uses findings from ‘psychedelic science’ as raw material for narrative, declaring all sorts of things – in radiant promotional broadcasts.

    Another thing I seem to notice, looking really closely. On one hand, there seems a veritable flood of funny ‘versions’ of such research – mostly getting the findings skewed, sometimes ass-backward wrong.

    On the other hand, one audibly detects the sound of a strange silence about such a glaring pattern – from researchers whose work is subjected to such ‘excited’ misrepresentation. Where is there any comment from the Swiss authors, or funding source (MAPS?), about the above horn blaring sensationalism? I wouldn’t want any research of mine exaggerated beyond recognition like that – notwithstanding PR spin to glorify it or damn it

    It seems a weird silence all thru the house, when researchers simply have nothing to say about the expedient recourse to their good names and reputations, outside their professional communities – to charge up a ‘fringe communitarian’ subculture, with ideological agenda for society. No matter how drastic the distortion of the actual findings – for some reason I just don’t find much comment from researchers whose work is being utilized, dare I say exploited – in popular milieu, for whatever purposes.

    Mr Spock (STAR TREK): “Fascinating” – Now that we’ve had the ‘wondergressive’ version, all about the 100% positive – which is not what I find the study reports (based on reading it).

    What might the Principal Investigator on this study, Dr. Gasser, have to say about any of this? Where is he, in this discussion? Or co-investigator Barbara Speich? I don’t see any quotes from them in the feature, nor replies to its representation of their study, in the above drum-banging account heralding it in certain terms – inaccurately, as seems.

    Par for the subculture’s ‘psychedelic science’ course, another routine drill.

    Like

    • Hey there MRockatansky, thanks for your feedback.

      The first quote in the article is a direct quote from Gasser. Additionally, the article presents both the positive and negative effects of LSD, and also blatantly warns that set and setting are crucial to not experiencing a bad trip. The article also stresses the importance of being under the guidance of a trained professional while under the influence of LSD, and that it is an historically effective tool in the realm of psychotherapy specifically.

      Cheers.

      Like

      • Thanks Eric – not to dispute the potential of LSD-like compounds for psychotherapy as you note (and primary research reflects). Only to note the sense of a circle to square, between your reply citation of ‘both the positive and negative effects’ (i.e. an appropriately balanced emphasis) – and the rosier-sounding, more eye-widening title note, ‘effects of LSD 100% positive’ (i.e. tabloid-like, sensational). My focus of reply goes to the larger, general context of mass media culture of circus-like exploitation. That gets the attention and approval of John Q Tripper, Joe Reader. And we have PT Barnum’s sage advice ‘give the public what it wants.’ Meanwhile, sound well-informed interest in the ‘psychedelic potential’ faces a struggle for legitimacy and wider acknowledgment. Question in view here for me, is how the subject’s frequent tabloid commodification, its ‘high’ exploitation value in narrative – function in such a situation, perhaps fatefully – when final die is cast. Seems a critical issue amid a proliferation of “100% positive” stories being circulated – given the history and trail of events since the 1943 discovery of LSD’s effects. And in general I’d still like to see reply from Principal Investigator(s), when their studies are cited in popular accounts – especially to address any questions of accuracy and validity. Unless scientists and researchers who produce findings amenable to such recourse have some responsibility – to be unaware how their work is cited and utilized in discourse outside their professional communities. I assume the above article was not submitted to Dr Gasser for reply, for him to either affirm or correct (if indicated from his pov as PI) any representation of his work – if he so wishes. Thank you again for your reply Eric, with regards.

        Like

  2. Dear MRockatansky:

    I think I understand what you are saying. (And I find the illustration at the top of the page to be painfully trite.) But I think it is important to note that Eric’s article is not intended as a scientific paper. Many people suffer from a rather limited attention span, and, although brief, what he has written may prove to be quite valuable to them.

    Please note that there is MUCH horrible anti-LSD propaganda being shoved down down the throats of uneducated young people these days.

    Dr. Drew Pinsky on “Loveline” is hyped to many millions of young people as being America’s leading drug expert. Teenagers around the world take his word as gospel. Recently Pinsky said that taking even small amounts of LSD causes severe brain damage. He said that all LSD visual phenomena is caused by brain damage. He said that taking LSD is exactly the same as being hit in the head very hard with a hammer.

    (“It has been my experience, particularly in the case of LSD, that people sometimes need to progress to electro-convulsive shock therapy.”

    —Dr. Drew Pinsky, March 19, 2002)

    After speaking with a number of young people recently, I was extremely dismayed to discover that every one of them is completely convinced that LSD causes horrific brain damage!!!

    DR. DREW IS NOT STUPID. HE IS DELIBERATELY LYING WHEN HE SAYS THAT LSD CAUSES BRAIN DAMAGE.

    Many studies have been made of LSD. There is ABSOLUTELY NO CREDIBLE EVIDENCE, recent or in the past, that LSD causes brain damage.

    But if someone a person greatly admires and completely trust tells a person that something will definitely harm them, then the person may in fact experience harm.

    (“…well-known studies of hypnosis demonstrate that inflammatory responses on the skin of subjects in trance can be induced or prevented by suggestion, and these effects are immediate. A hypnotist can touch a subject in deep trance with a finger, representing it as a piece of hot metal, and a blister will appear at the site of contact. Conversely, suggestion can prevent blistering in response to contact with a real piece of hot metal.”

    —Andrew Weil, M.D., in his book 8 WEEKS TO OPTIMUM HEALTH, 1998.)

    (“In 2007, Berkeley and UC San Francisco became the first American universities since the 1960s to get permission from the FDA for a small-scale research project that administered LSD to human subjects. That research, measuring how LSD might foster creativity in users by measuring the neural activity that accompanies altered states of consciousness, was proposed by Matthew Baggott, this time under the supervision of Dr. Reese Jones, a professor of psychiatry at UCSF. It was funded by the Oxford, England–based Beckley Foundation, a charitable trust that promotes research into human consciousness and was one of the co-sponsors of the psychedelic sciences conference last spring. Beckley Foundation director Amanda Feilding said she was “very, very surprised” when the FDA issued an “Investigational New Drug” (IND) authorization for their proposed LSD study.

    Other researchers agreed that getting federal approval for an LSD study was a milestone in the new wave of psychedelic research.”

    “So far, the federal government has issued IND authorizations for only two studies that administer LSD to human subjects—the Baggott/Jones project and a Swiss study funded by Doblin’s organization.”

    —Don Lattin, in California [UC Berkeley Alumni magazine], Fall, 2010.)

    The FDA does not allow researchers to give a substance to human subjects if the substance causes brain damage, or if the FDA has even the remotest suspicion that the substance causes brain damage.

    More about LSD here:

    Important Warning

    Like

  3. Dear MRockatansky:

    I think I understand what you are saying. (And I find the illustration at the top of the page to be painfully trite.) But I think it is important to note that Eric’s article is not intended as a scientific paper. Many people suffer from a rather limited attention span, and, although brief, what he has written may prove to be quite valuable to them.

    Please note that there is MUCH horrible anti-LSD propaganda being shoved down down the throats of uneducated young people these days.

    Dr. Drew Pinsky on “Loveline” is hyped to many millions of young people as being America’s leading drug expert. Teenagers around the world take his word as gospel. Recently Pinsky said that taking even small amounts of LSD causes severe brain damage. He said that all LSD visual phenomena is caused by brain damage. He said that taking LSD is exactly the same as being hit in the head very hard with a hammer.

    (“It has been my experience, particularly in the case of LSD, that people sometimes need to progress to electro-convulsive shock therapy.”

    —Dr. Drew Pinsky, March 19, 2002)

    After speaking with a number of young people recently, I was extremely dismayed to discover that every one of them is completely convinced that LSD causes horrific brain damage!!!

    DR. DREW IS NOT STUPID. HE IS DELIBERATELY LYING WHEN HE SAYS THAT LSD CAUSES BRAIN DAMAGE.

    Many studies have been made of LSD. There is ABSOLUTELY NO CREDIBLE EVIDENCE, recent or in the past, that LSD causes brain damage.

    But if someone a person greatly admires and completely trust tells a person that something will definitely harm them, then the person may in fact experience harm.

    (“…well-known studies of hypnosis demonstrate that inflammatory responses on the skin of subjects in trance can be induced or prevented by suggestion, and these effects are immediate. A hypnotist can touch a subject in deep trance with a finger, representing it as a piece of hot metal, and a blister will appear at the site of contact. Conversely, suggestion can prevent blistering in response to contact with a real piece of hot metal.”

    —Andrew Weil, M.D., in his book 8 WEEKS TO OPTIMUM HEALTH, 1998.)

    (“In 2007, Berkeley and UC San Francisco became the first American universities since the 1960s to get permission from the FDA for a small-scale research project that administered LSD to human subjects. That research, measuring how LSD might foster creativity in users by measuring the neural activity that accompanies altered states of consciousness, was proposed by Matthew Baggott, this time under the supervision of Dr. Reese Jones, a professor of psychiatry at UCSF. It was funded by the Oxford, England–based Beckley Foundation, a charitable trust that promotes research into human consciousness and was one of the co-sponsors of the psychedelic sciences conference last spring. Beckley Foundation director Amanda Feilding said she was “very, very surprised” when the FDA issued an “Investigational New Drug” (IND) authorization for their proposed LSD study.

    Other researchers agreed that getting federal approval for an LSD study was a milestone in the new wave of psychedelic research.”

    “So far, the federal government has issued IND authorizations for only two studies that administer LSD to human subjects—the Baggott/Jones project and a Swiss study funded by Doblin’s organization.”

    —Don Lattin, in California [UC Berkeley Alumni magazine], Fall, 2010.)

    The FDA does not allow researchers to give a substance to human subjects if the substance causes brain damage, or if the FDA has even the remotest suspicion that the substance causes brain damage.

    More about LSD here:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdyf333/2075297284/

    Like

    • Davivid – for my delay replying, apologies. For your post – my thanks, with interest. A great deal you say, I can’t disagree with at all – in terms of its factual validity and truth. That’s appreciable. The one caveat, perhaps – involves perspective I might put it in.

      Its true as you say, a popularized news feature about a study – is not a study. That dovetails, rather than disagrees, with my purport (on impression) – which (if I may politely protest) suggests nothing contrary – but rather looks at other questions, of different type. For example about popular sciencey narrative of by and for non-scientists, especially within a social milieu of controversy and even ideological power struggle.

      BTW – like you I gather – I don’t respect Dr Drew’s recent commentary you cited. And I’d go further still. The entire context is likewise problematic, with its concentric layers equally involved. What is a network that presents him doing that – thinking? There is a much larger social context, with more complicated issues.

      But, I’d moderate you on this one: “Please note that there is MUCH horrible anti-LSD propaganda being shoved down down the throats of uneducated young people these days.” I can’t call that a verifiably accurate statement; more a matter of editorial opinion (which is perfectly okay) – impression, ‘horrible’ and “MUCH” and “shoved down” figures of speech etc.

      (Nor am I aware of teenagers around the world you refer to, taking what Dr Drew says as gospel – how could I be, how might anyone independently verify that?)

      On the other hand – your approach, almost to touch but not quite – my exact perspective. Key distinction, as you rightly tagged it, is: propaganda.

      Exactly right, and I don’t know what else to call misinfo, clearly resistant to any correction, on merest factual ground, independently verifiable and demonstrable as such. But here’s the rub my friend: propaganda, misinfo held above correction, questions never to be answered, confusion that isn’t interested in being cleared up – is likewise the bread and butter of the popular psychedelic press. Except, for not against, pro- not con-.

      I’d love for Eric (not to single him out, only a matter of the present case in point) say – you’re right. That “100% positive” headline of this feature is (first) not reasonably true or accurate to the study it reports on – as his reply “the article presents both the positive and negative effects of LSD” indeed reflects (without fully acknowledging, I feel).

      I do find a problem with propaganda, as leading mode of discussion where this subject comes up. And its one hand (con-) really seems to thrive on the other (pro-), both giving their loyal opposition plenty of ammo to work with.

      I join you in your reasoned objection to Dr Drew’s nonsense about LSD. I find anti-LSD propaganda, however, at a much lower level than 1960’s. I based that on the entire record, taking into account all sources I can find – rather than picking/choosing this and that, as in time-honored rhetorical argumentation – grand tradition of reasoned critical disagreement, especially in days before the Scientific Revolution.

      I submit, at the same time, an even-handed nonpartisan, impartially critical perspective – will find propaganda is a serious core issue; but in the fray, neither side has a monopoly on it. If I were judge, I’d come down as hard on enthusiast subculture for its violations of factual truth and sound sensibly informed perspective on its proprietary interest (tripping, psychedelics) – as I would on the prejudicially negativizing side. So, I’d respectfully challenge you to a much harder, steeper, rockier standard of critical perspective here. I’d abjectly refrain from any exaggerations or poetic license on behalf of either ideological bias – propaganda, distortion, disinfo etc. Which I find on both sides, river deep and mountain high, in abundance. Respectful wishes.

      Like

      • Dear MRockatansky:

        I agree with what you have written. And I apologize for including statements that cannot be independently verified. (I have been a poet all of my adult life, and identify strongly with poetry. But that is no excuse for my making unscientific statements.)

        I spent more than 40 years amassing a collection of popular literature on the subject of drugs. MANY, MANY books! All most all of which I read. One thing I learned was that almost 100% of them were either outright propaganda or were written by people who made mistaken assertions. ESPECIALLY books and articles about psychedelics. My collection weighed many thousands of pounds. I could pick up with one hand a small bag containing the extraordinarily few books that were not severely biased.

        PEACE

        and thank you for taking the time to so thoughtfully reply to my comment!

        Like

      • “…the matches and mismatches between…two…signals, one generated inside the brain and the other from the outside world, ultimately define what we perceive as reality. That implies that there is no absolute truth, because the brain is not a mere slave to what, for example, our retinas report to have seen.”

        “…it is the collision of these two…signals…that generates the…pattern of electrical activity that morphs into one’s perception of the world.”

        —Miguel Nicolelis, M.D., Ph.D., in his 2011 book BEYOND BOUNDARIES: The New Neuroscience of Connecting Brains with Machines–and How It Will Change Our Lives. Nicolelis was named one of the 20 most influential scientists in the world by Scientific American magazine.

        Like

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